Statements of Service ​Provision

2 Environment
​Taiao

The Council is responsible for vital services such as water supply, waste reduction and disposal, wastewater and stormwater services. We fund conservation attractions such as Zealandia and Wellington Zoo, manage open spaces such as the Town Belt, Outer Green Belt and the city’s beaches and coastline.

We fund these services because they are critical to the lives of individual Wellingtonians and to the community as a whole. They ensure that the city is safe and liveable, that basic human needs are met and they minimise harmful effects from human activity. They also provide recreation opportunities, attract visitors, and make the city a beautiful place to live.

Our environment objectives

Security of supply

Waste reduction

Access to green open spaces

Biodiversity

Our environment activities contribute to us being:

People–centred: High quality natural environments enhance Wellington’s unique ‘sense of place’, making it an even better place to live, work and play. They attract visitors and provide attractive, safe and accessible opportunities for leisure and recreation.

Connected: Accessible and high quality natural and green environments encourage people to gather together, share activities and connect with each other. Networks of green spaces and corridors link the city with its coastline and beaches. Conservation connects people with the environment and links the present to the future.

An eco-city: High quality natural and green environments protect and enhance our biodiversity and contribute to off-setting our carbon emissions. They model Wellington’s leadership role as capital city of a clean and green New Zealand and as a leading sustainable city of the 21st Century.

A dynamic central city: A reliable and adequate supply of clean and safe water is critical for people to live, work, study and play in the central city and increasingly it will distinguish Wellington from other cities as a desirable and healthy place to live and establish a business.

Case study

Smart energy challenge

The Smart Energy Challenge is a Wellington-wide collaboration that brings together businesses, community partners, entrepreneurs and Wellington City Council to help sustainable business refine, connect, and launch their ideas for smarter energy in Wellington.

This is a new way for the Council to tackle climate change by joining forces with our community and empowering Wellingtonians to create positive solutions.

If the teams are successful in raising their target funds from the community, Wellington City Council will match the amount they have raised dollar for dollar.

Wellington is a city that already has many people using methods other than cars to get around. Russell and Liberty from Newtown have a vision for Wellington where bikes play a larger part in how our city works. They are helping to make this happen with their bike deliveries project.

Fuelled by an enthusiasm for all things bike-related, No Car Cargo offers cargo bikes as a viable means of transporting small to medium-sized goods around the Wellington CBD and surrounding suburbs, and provides people and businesses with bikes as an affordable and friendly option.

No Car Cargo was one of five teams taking part in the 2015 Smart Energy Challenge.

For Russell and Liberty, the Challenge was a great chance to get their idea up and running, gain experience and learn what they need to make this project succeed. No Car Cargo used the Smart Energy Challenge workshops to develop and launch their business.

One of their first customers is Fix and Fogg, artisan peanut butter makers based in Eva Street. Fix and Fogg co-founder Roman Jewell says having No Car Cargo to deliver within the CBD is a great match for their product. “We believe in keeping things pure and simple. Russell helps us keep our philosophy alive all the way to the customer.”

Case study

Parks Week Pop-Up Forest

The ‘activation’ of Bond St in the central city provided the perfect opportunity for the Council to launch Parks Week 2015 with a Pop-Up Forest. Parks Week is an annual international celebration of the important role that our parks play in contributing to the health of our communities and cities. It provides the Council with an opportunity to promote Wellington’s beautiful native bush reserves, botanic gardens, restoration planting programmes and other park programmes.

The Pop-Up Forest launch event received extensive media interest including television coverage highlighting Wellington parks and the Council’s many environmental initiatives. A total of 27 Parks Week opportunities were offered to the community and these activities were located in 25 open spaces across Wellington. More than 6,000 Wellingtonians took the opportunity to engage in a Parks Week activity.

The Pop-Up forest was set up for just one day and was created from approximately 3,000 native trees borrowed from Berhampore Nursery and included 700 giveaway plants from the Forest & Bird nursery. Visitor count estimates were more than 1,500 over the course of the day, with approximately 500 people on site between 12 and 1pm alone. A further 700 people came back later on in the day to receive a free native plant. All of these plants were labelled with care instructions and many were also labelled ‘Kereru friendly’ by the Kereru Discovery team. The giveaway also contributed to achieving the Council’s 2 million trees by 2020 project.

 

2.1
Gardens, beaches and green open spaces
Ngā wāhi wātea me ngā mahi papa atawhai

We manage the city’s natural environment and gardens in ways that balance conservation and enhancement with opportunities for enjoyment and recreation.

 

What we do

Wellington is surrounded by nature. We preserve the city’s unique environment and protect and restore its biodiversity. A high-quality natural environment enhances the city’s unique ‘sense of place’ and provides attractive, safe and accessible spaces for leisure and recreation. Our aim is to enhance enjoyment of these areas. Our activities include providing:

  • 4,000ha of parks, reserves and beaches
  • 200 buildings for community use
  • 340km of walking and mountain bike tracks
  • over 200,000 m² of amenity bedding and horticultural areas
  • boat ramps, wharves, seawalls and slipways
  • enhancement and protection of our biodiversity (pest management).

What we achieved

Engagement on the Biodiversity Action Plan and Our Natural Capital Biodiversity Strategy. In 2015, we finalised our biodiversity strategy and developed an implementation plan to protect and restore the City’s indigenous biodiversity. This strategy outlines our vision, goals and objectives and sets the priorities that give our work direction and purpose, underpinned by a set of guiding principles. This showcases how the Council’s investment in Otari-Wilton’s Bush, Berhampore Nursery and biodiversity management places Wellington’s conservation efforts at world class level.

The Otari-Wilton’s Bush team successfully germinated the regionally rare Brachglottis kirkii (common name Kohurangi or Kirk’s Daisy) after a 5 year trial and helped save the native daisy Celmisia ‘managweka from the brink of extinction. Otari-Wilton’s Bush is now a registered provider for the New Zealand Indigenous Flora Seed Bank, which is part of the international Millennium Seed Bank project. Combined with the reviewed eco-sourcing and seed collection work by the Council’s Berhampore Nursery, we are delivering national best practice in restoration.

We also completed the path realignment of the central collections trail at Otari-Wilton’s Bush. The Leonard Cockayne Centre at Otari-Wilton’s Bush is complete and now provides a wonderful bookable destination for education purposes, workshops and meetings.

We have had an exciting year of threatened bird breeding in our parks, including the saddleback. Wellington now also has banded dotterels breeding on the South Coast.

We protected Wellington’s biodiversity. We are increasing the funding available for pest control initiatives in the next ten years to protect Wellington’s biodiversity. This falls under the auspices of Our Natural Capital, Wellington’s Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan.

We maintained and beautified our beaches and coast. We replenished Oriental Bay beaches with 1,200 tonnes of new sand in order to restore 2003 levels and completed the strengthening of the Evans Bay northern boat ramp with new timber piles, bearers and a concrete surface.

We worked with our partners on key projects such as Restoration Day, the Great Kereru Count, Victoria University Summer Scholars, Porirua Harbour Strategy and the Southwest Peninsula Goat Project. Wellington Botanic Garden and Otari-Wilton’s Bush have become partners in the Nature Connections programme, celebrating Wellington’s inspiring nature stories – see our stories on natureconnections.org.nz.

We upgraded our Town Belt. The Council and community groups planted 80,845 plants and involved school children and corporate groups in many of these plantings. We set in place a 5 year contract to replant the sites around the city that were damaged in the 2014 storms.

We managed the botanic gardens for the benefit of everyone. It has been a great year for awards for the Botanic Gardens of Wellington: Wellington’s popular Lady Norwood Rose Garden has won the prestigious 2015 World Federation of Rose Societies Garden of Excellence Award; Otari-Wilton’s Bush won an international Green Flag award, given to a select number of the best parks in the world; and Wellington Botanic Garden Curator, Karl Noldan, won the amenity sector for Young Horticulturalist of the Year and goes on to compete in the national finals. We also removed a large amount of sediment from the duck pond in the Gardens, making it fresh and ready for another busy spring and summer season.

We supported community organisations and projects. We provided grants to community organisations through the Our Living City Fund. This helps make the city a better place through supporting planting projects, community gardens, environmental initiatives and local clean ups. In 2014/15, we supported 22 projects with grants ranging from $220 to $12,000, and these ranged from bird monitoring, pest control projects and clean ups on beaches, to community gardens in schools and play centres.

How we performed

This activity offers good value for money, is highly used by satisfied residents and is maintained to a high standard.

We measure the standard of the open spaces we provide

Residents’ (%) satisfaction with the quality and maintenance of local parks and reserves, gardens and beaches

Residents (%) who agree that green open spaces, gardens and beaches provide good value for money

Result: 82% (Target: 90%. 2013/14: 77%; 2012/13: 80%).

Source: WCC Residents Monitoring Survey 2015

Residents’ (%) satisfaction with the quality and maintenance of green open spaces

We maintain roadside vegetation to enable safe traffic movement. Sometimes we are asked to remove vegetation for other reasons, which are outside our scope. Some of the dissatisfaction with this service may result from this tension between our policies and people’s expectations.

We measure the use of the open spaces we provide

Residents’ frequency (%) of usage of local parks and reserves (yearly and weekly)

This year, while we have not met our targets for weekly use, many residents access our parks and reserves on a monthly or yearly basis.

Number of visitors to the Botanic Garden

Result: 1,354,681 (Target: 1,200,000. 2014/13: 1,542,535; 2012/13: 1,141,398).

This year, a good summer, an increase in cruise ship passengers making independent trips and visiting teams and supporters associated with the Cricket World Cup and Football World Cup, have led to our estimated visitor count for the Botanic Garden exceeding target.

Source: Botanic Gardens

Residents’ frequency (%) of usage of Botanic Garden (yearly and weekly)

This year, while we have not reached our targets for weekly use of botanic gardens, residents’ yearly use has significantly exceeded target.

Residents’ frequency (%) of usage of beaches and coastal areas (yearly and weekly)

This year, while we have not met our targets for weekly usage of beaches and coastal areas, residents’ yearly usage is on target.

Residents’ frequency (%) usage of walkways (yearly and weekly)

We measure the standard of our street cleaning service

Street cleaning (%) compliance with quality performance standards3

Result: 97% (Target: 100%. 2013/14: 95%; 2012/13: 97%; 2011/12: 99%; 2010/11: 99%).

Source: WCC City Networks

We measure our efforts to protect and enhance biodiversity and native species health

Total number of native plantings undertaken by WCC

Result: 42,220 (Target: 45,000. 2013/14: 50,712; 2012/13: 41,155).

Source: WCC Parks, Sport and Recreation

Total number of native plants provided by WCC for community planting

Result: 38,625 (Target: 34,000. 2013/14: 32,378; 2012/13: 32,162).

This year, due to continuing demand from groups wanting plants early in the season, the total number of plants we provide has increased significantly. This was achieved by shifting the balance between community planting and planting we have undertaken, for this financial year.

Source: WCC Parks, Sport and Recreation

High value biodiversity sites (%) covered by integrated animal pest control or weed control

Result: 67% (Target: 70%. 2013/14: 52%; 2012/13: 52%).

Source: WCC Parks, Sport and Recreation

Proportion of grant funds successfully allocated (through milestones being met)

Result: 100% (Target: 95%. 2013/14: 97%; 2012/13: 100%).

Source: WCC Community Networks

Proportion of project outcomes that are successfully achieved (weighted by $ value)

Result: 100% (Target: 90%. 2013/14: n/a).

Source: WCC Community Networks

What it cost

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.1.1 Local Parks and Open Spaces
Expenditure 8,497 8,545 48 8,439
Revenue (608) (611) (3) (863)
Net Expenditure 7,889 7,934 45 7,576
2.1.2 Botanical Gardens
Expenditure 4,883 4,762 (121) 4,715
Revenue (417) (409) 8 (364)
Net Expenditure 4,466 4,353 (113) 4,351
2.1.3 Beaches and Coast Operations1
Expenditure 996 1,371 375 964
Revenue (50) (51) (1) (50)
Net Expenditure 946 1,320 374 914
2.1.4 Roads Open Spaces2
Expenditure 8,204 7,645 (559) 9,132
Revenue (614) (667) (53) (553)
Net Expenditure 7,590 6,978 (612) 8,579
2.1.5 Town Belts3
Expenditure 4,283 5,080 797 4,783
Revenue (1,425) (209) 1,216 (1,276)
Net Expenditure 2,858 4,871 2,013 3,507
2.1.6 Community Environmental Initiatives
Expenditure 634 632 (2) 456
Revenue (1) - 1 (9)
Net Expenditure 633 632 (1) 447
2.1.7 Walkways
Expenditure 569 597 28 525
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 569 597 28 525
2.1.8 Biodiversity (pest management)
Expenditure 1,663 1,530 (133) 1,397
Revenue (76) (38) 38 (133)
Net Expenditure 1,587 1,492 (95) 1,264
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.1.1 Local Parks and Open Spaces4
Expenditure 1,116 813 (303) 1,939
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward n/a 505 - n/a
2.1.2 Botanical Gardens5
Expenditure 681 602 (79) 661
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward n/a - - n/a
2.1.3 Beaches and Coast Operations
Expenditure 613 568 (45) 147
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward n/a - - n/a
2.1.5 Town Belts
Expenditure 106 110 4 113
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward n/a - - n/a
2.1.7 Walkways
Expenditure 624 625 1 158
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward n/a - - n/a
  1. Under budget due as grant funding for the Lyall Bay Surf Club was not paid as the club is still fund-raising for their new building.
  2. Over budget due to decision not to implement new bins, after trials did not deliver expected benefits.
  3. Under due to to unbudgeted vested asset revenue and savings in rates expenses.
  4. Budget includes $220,000 carried forward from the 2013/14 year for the Watts Peninsula and Children's Garden projects. The Halfway House refurbishment cost more than expected but this was offset by delays in the Children's Garden development at the Botanical Gardens.
  5. Over budget due to work at Otari Wilton's bush which was budgeted in 2013/14 year and the budgets were not initially carried forward in 2014/15. This was subsequently approved by the Council.

 

2.2
Waste reduction and energy conservation
Whakaiti para, hangarua me te pena pūnga
Top

Sustainability is about meeting our needs now without burdening future generations.

 

What we do

A sustainable city uses resources efficiently, re-uses or recycles them and only commits them to landfills as a last resort. Sustainability is about reducing the amount of energy we use and using clean energy from renewable sources. It is also about promoting a culture that values the environment and encourages pro-environment behaviour of everyone who lives, works or studies here. We manage and monitor:

  • landfill operations / composting waste at the Southern Landfill
  • domestic recycling and rubbish collection
  • the environmental impacts of closed landfills
  • programmes to educate residents to manage and minimise waste effectively.

What we achieved

Wellington was accepted into the 100 Resilient Cities Network. A thousand cities across six continents applied to be among the first 100 cities selected to receive technical support and resources over 3 years. Selected cities receive:

Wellington's Chief Resilience Officer will be appointed by October 2015. Their job will be to engage diverse stakeholders, identify Wellington's resilience challenges, opportunities and priorities, develop and implement a 'whole of system' City Resilience Strategy over the following 2 years.

We participated in the World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Sendai. Deputy Mayor Justin Lester and Chief Asset Officer Anthony Wilson joined New Zealand's official delegation to Sendai in March. Delegates from 190 countries negotiated a new global framework to reduce risks from disasters and make communities safer. New Zealand's expertise in engineering and research in this area is internationally recognised. In addition to applying best practice and lessons learned elsewhere to make Wellington safer and more resilient, this is also an opportunity for Wellington firms and researchers.

We produced regional greenhouse inventories. The Council partnered with other councils in the Wellington Region to produce greenhouse gas inventories from 2000/01 to 2012/13.

We are consulting with the community about Island Bay seawall. The Council is investigating design options for the Island Bay seawall and surrounding areas and we have worked with the local community on possible solutions. The options development took into account long-term sea level rise projections and government guidance for managing climate change impacts. A final solution for the Island Bay seawall will be determined through a South Coast Resilience Strategy, scheduled to be completed in 2015/16.

We supported Warm-Up New Zealand: Healthy Homes. The Council’s partner, the Sustainability Trust, completed 265 insulation retrofits for low-income households in Wellington, supported by funding from various other organisations, including the Council. Almost 1,000 low-income households have received Council funding support for insulation retrofits since 2010/11.

We supported the Home Energy Saver programme. Over 500 Wellington households received free home sustainability assessments as part of our Home Energy Saver programme. The Council’s new service provider, the Sustainability Trust, is now offering tablet-based assessments, improving data analysis and the overall efficiency of the programme. Households are also offered partially subsidised LED lighting.

We are a smart energy capital – the following projects were undertaken in the past year:

We worked towards securing resource consent for stage 4 of the Southern Landfill. We reviewed the current landfill capacity and the proposed Stage 4 extension. As a result of this, we have modified the design of the extension, and have been able to defer the commissioning date and reduce the capital expenditure required for the new stage. We now intend to secure consents for Stage 4 in 2016/17.

Unique emissions factor for Southern Landfill. After a significant effort over the last 2 years around our application for a Unique Emissions Factor (UEF) under the NZ Emissions Trading Scheme, we have been successful in achieving a UEF of 0.82. This reduced our carbon liability for the 2014 calendar by 37% compared with the default emissions factor. We will continue to look for ways to improve this, including looking at our gas collection, how we calculate our theoretical methane emissions and how the next stage of the landfill should be developed. We will also focus on our carbon purchasing strategies, as how and when we purchase carbon units will have a huge impact on how we manage future price increases for the landfill.

We supported a national food waste prevention project. Food waste is becoming an increasingly popular topic of discussion internationally, and here in Wellington, we try to divert it from landfill by using initiatives like our Kai to Compost service. Regionally, a joint project involving the Wellington region’s nine councils identified organic waste as a key area to manage. A project was designed to better understand the issue of household food waste and this was signed off by the Council’s steering committee. A national promotional campaign was also launched in March 2015, designed to publicise the results of this research and raise public awareness. The project team is developing and piloting resources and tools to support councils, community groups, environment centres and other waste champions to promote food waste minimisation, and this will be an on-going focus for the next 3 years.

How we performed

The services in this activity are well used by residents, who are satisfied with the services we provide. Efforts to reduce our environmental footprint continue, with high use of recycling services, and a focus on renewable energy generation and waste mitigation.

We measure how well we provide, and encourage the use of, recycling services to divert valuable material from the waste stream

Residents’ (%) satisfaction with recycling and waste collection

Waste diverted from landfill and total waste to landfill (tonnes)

Waste diverted from the landfill includes kerbside recycling, green waste, hazardous waste, waste diverted through our Kai to Compost initiative, waste transferred to the recycle shop for resale, scrap metal and contaminated soil. In past years, contaminated soil has comprised a significant proportion of the total waste diverted from the landfill. For example, in 2010/11, this comprised 71%, or 46,000 of a 65,000 total. From 2011/12, we stopped including contaminated soil as diverted material, as we did not consider it a diverted waste stream. This has resulted in the quantity of diverted material decreasing.

We will look at restating this measure to explicitly exclude contaminated soil in the 2016/17 Annual Plan.

Residents’ (%) weekly usage of kerbside recycling collection service

This year 61% of residents used kerbside recycling weekly, and 31% used it fortnightly. This measure has been updated in the LTP 2015/25 to measure residents’ weekly, fortnightly, and monthly use of recycling services. Based on this measure, 91% of residents use recycling services fortnightly.

Kerbside recycling collected (tonnes)

We measure how efficiently we dispose of waste and its impact on the environment

Energy sourced from the Southern Landfill

Result: 7.6GWh (Target: 8GWh. 2013/14: 7.0GWh; 2012/13: 5.2GWh; 2011/12: 8.3GWh; 2010/11: 7.4GWh).

Source: Nova Energy

Residents (%) agreement that waste management services provide good value for money

Result: 82% (Target: 85%. 2013/14: 80%; 2012/13: 80%).

Source: WCC Residents Monitoring Survey 2015

We measure energy use at Council sites

WCC corporate energy use (electricity and natural gas)

Properties Target Result Explanation
WCC general (now includes all gas and large electricity sites) Decrease from previous year (18,454,850 kwh) 20,660,224 Variance is the result of City Shaper transferring from Main CCOs to WCC General. If 2013/14 results were normalised to reflect this change, both performance measures would have variances of less than 5%.
WCC pools and recreation facilities Decrease from previous year (18,446,633 kwh) 19,320,398 The reopening of the expanded Keith Spry pool and Wellington Regional Aquatic Center heating plant problems led to this result slightly exceeding target.
Main CCOs Decrease from previous year (9,866,969 kwh) 7,204,428 See WCC general explanation.

Source: WCC Energy Management

We measure the reduction of the Council’s environmental footprint

WCC Corporate greenhouse gas emissions (tonnes CO2-e)

Result: n/a (Target: Compared to 2003, reduce emissions 40% by 2020 and 80% by 2050).

This year we began the process for the Council to become CEMARS certified. CEMARS certification (Certified Emissions Measurement and Reduction Scheme) will allow the Council to measure its greenhouse gas emissions, put in place plans to reduce them and have both of these steps independently certified.

The audit and verification process for the Council’s 2014/15 corporate emissions will be complete by October 2015. In order to achieve CEMARS certification, the Council will need to complete an emissions reduction plan for the organisation. Through the emissions reduction plan, a new base year (2014/15) and new emissions reduction target will be agreed.

Source: WCC Our Living City

Number of carbon credits generated from Council reserves per annum

Result: 74,643 (Target: 5,000. 2013/14: 30,913).

During the year the Council received 74,643 units as part of its annual allocation of units for post-1989 forests placed either in the Emissions Trading Scheme or the Permanent Forest Sink Initiative.

The target of 5,000 was set as a default. When field measurements were done, we realised that we generate more carbon credits than anticipated. We are looking at updating this target in future years.

Source: New Zealand Emission Unit Register account

What it cost

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.2.1 Waste Minimisation, Disposal and Recycling Management1
Expenditure 12,663 12,802 139 11,292
Revenue (13,308) (12,926) 382 (12,195)
Net Expenditure (645) (124) 521 (903)
2.2.2 Closed Landfills Aftercare
Expenditure 368 404 36 (289)
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 368 404 36 (289)
2.2.3 Energy Efficiency and Conservation
Expenditure - - - -
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure - - - -
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.2.1 Waste Minimisation, Disposal and Recycling Management2
Expenditure 781 918 137 339
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward n/a 60   n/a
  1. Under budget due to higher than budgeted rubbish bag sales and increased revenue from waste minimisation activities.
  2. Budget includes $202,000 carried forward from the 2013/14 year for the Stage 4 Extension of the Southern Landfill.

 

2.3
Water
Wai
Top

Clean and safe water is essential for residents’ quality of life and wellbeing.

 

What we do

These services are delivered by Wellington Water and include:

  • ensuring high quality water is available at all times for drinking and other household and business uses
  • maintaining 80 reservoirs, 34 pumping stations, 8,000 hydrants and 1,250km of pipes.

What we achieved

We checked the seismic resilience of water reservoirs, pump stations, telemetry systems and critical pipeline fittings, along with strengthening the Maldive, Maupuia and Linden reservoirs. In the last year we worked with Wellington Water to install 12 new 25,000 litre emergency water tanks, two of which replaced older damaged tanks. There are now 35 emergency water tanks at 31 locations in suburbs around Wellington.

We developed a programme of activities to improve water network resilience. Emergency preparedness efforts continued, including installing auto-shut values in the Karori and Broadmeadows reservoirs and the ongoing seismic strengthening of the Newlands and Linden reservoirs. These reservoirs are being strengthened in order to enhance water retention performance after a significant seismic event.

We developed a map with our GIS team for our website, which shows the location of emergency water tanks in suburbs around Wellington.

We upgraded the network in Cave Road, Houghton Bay Road and The Esplanade in order to meet firefighting standards.

We constructed a new reservoir in Melrose, as the existing reservoir was considered to present an unacceptable level of risk in a significant seismic event.

We renewed approximately 6km of water mains including service pipes to properties.

We upgraded Karori pump station and began work upgrading the Lyndhurst Road pump station.

How we performed

Our water supply is of very good quality, outages are rare and services are delivered to a high standard. This year we complied with all relevant water standards, and individual and collective water consumption levels did not exceed target.

We measure the quality of water supplied to residents

Compliance with Drinking Water Standards for New Zealand 2005

Compliance was achieved with the NZ drinking water standards and all 11 zones of Wellington City’s water supply zones were graded A1. (Target: Achieve compliance. 2013/14: Achieved).

Source: Wellington Water

Residents (%) agreement that water services provide good value for money

Result: 83% (Target: 90%. 2013/14: 77%; 2012/13: 81%).

Source: WCC Residents Monitoring Survey 2015

Customer complaints regarding water quality (taste and odour)

Result: 145 complaints (Target: fewer than 200. 2013/14: 196; 2012/13: 165; 2011/12: 202; 2010/11: 289).

This year there has been a significant drop in the number of complaints received. In past years the majority of complaints have been linked to the potable water source changing the taste of the water. The form of water source used is linked to weather, so we have only a limited capacity to influence the result for this measure.

Source: Wellington Water

Customer satisfaction (%) with water quality and network service

We measure the performance of services that ensure security of supply

Water pressure

Result: 96% of properties had appropriate water pressure, i.e. minimum of 250kPa (Target 97%. 2013/14: 96%; 2012/13: 96%; 2011/12: 96%; 2010/11: 96%).

Source: Wellington Water

Fire hydrants

Result: 94% of fire hydrants tested met New Zealand Fire Service Code of Practice for firefighting water supply requirements (Target: 95%. 2013/14: 99%; 2012/13: 100%; 2011/12: 100%).

Source: Wellington Water

Water distribution network – quality grading

Result: All parts of the network retained a grading of ‘b’ based on the Ministry of Health quality grading (Target: ‘a’ to ‘b’ grading).

Source: Wellington Water

Response time to services request (%) within one hour of notification

The number of service requests in this category for 2014/15 was 809, and in 2013/14 it was 819.

Unaccounted for water (%) from the network

Residential water consumption (per person per day)

Result: 273 litres per person per day (Target: 287 litres per person per day. 2013/14: 264; 2012/13: 288; 2011/12: 282; 2010/11: 297).

Source: Wellington Water

Total city water consumption during the year

Result: 26.6 billion litres (Target: less than 30 billion litres. 2013/14: 26.4; 2012/13: 26.6).

Source: Wellington Water

What it cost

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.3.1 Water Network1
Expenditure 22,798 25,738 2,940 24,260
Revenue (1,012) (33) 979 (1,151)
Net Expenditure 21,786 25,705 3,919 23,109
2.3.2 Water Collection and Treatment
Expenditure 14,318 14,174 (144) 13,804
Revenue (3) - 3 (3)
Net Expenditure 14,315 14,174 (141) 13,801
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.3.1 Water Network2
Expenditure 13,266 13,003 (263) 10,984
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward n/a - - n/a
  1. Under budget due to savings on insurance costs and depreciation, following the revaluation of infrastructure assets.
  2. Budget includes $710,000 carried forward from the 2013/14 year for several renewals projects. Over budget as a result of a higher level of reactive renewals and the Owen Street water main renewal being completed ahead of schedule.

 

2.4
Wastewater
Parawai
Top

Maintaining public health and safety and having clean waterways is essential to the city’s environmental wellbeing.

 

What we do

These services are delivered by Wellington Water and include providing and monitoring:

  • the city’s sewage collection, treatment and disposal in line with resource consent conditions
  • we monitor the performance of Wellington Water.

What we achieved

We reviewed the Trade Waste and Transportation of Waste Bylaws.

We progressed a pilot programme to investigate and evaluate how private drains contribute to wastewater overflows. An inflow and infiltration survey was undertaken in Hataitai, which identified 232 locations with one or more faults out of the 1,596 locations surveyed. These identified faults were categorised using risk assessment with a grading of ‘High’, ‘Medium’ and ‘Low’. An action plan will be put in place to address the faults identified. From this survey it is evident that faults in private drains have an influence in contributing to inflow and infiltration to the wastewater network.

We reduced sewage pollution in three priority catchments. Pollution investigations have been on-going in catchments which have exceeded the water quality thresholds. These investigations have identified some faults that have been remedied, resulting in minor improvements in water quality in certain catchments. Our efforts to improve and maintain the water quality of catchments in Wellington are ongoing.

How we performed

Our wastewater network is of a high quality and customers continue to be very satisfied with the services we provide. We continue to work on mitigating freshwater contamination and our sewage network remains fully compliant with its resource consent.

We measure the standard of wastewater services

Customer (%) satisfaction with wastewater services

Response time to service requests (%) within one hour of notification

Result: 99% of requests were responded to within one hour of notification (Target: 95%. 2013/14: 95%; 2012/13: 67%). In 2014/15, there were 791 calls in this category and in 2013/14, 894 service requests were received.

Source: Wellington Water

Residents (%) who agree wastewater services provide good value for money

Result: 78% (Target: 75%. 2013/14: 73%; 2012/13: 79%).

Source: WCC Residents Monitoring Survey 2015

We measure the impact of wastewater on the environment

Freshwater sites (%) within acceptable faecal coliform counts

Freshwater water quality in certain catchments is poor. This is attributed to faults present in the public and private wastewater network. Investigations are on-going in those catchments (Cummings Park, Ngauranga, Karori and Owhiro) identified as having poor water quality. These investigations have identified some faults which have been remedied.

Sewage network – resource consent compliance

Result: non-compliant (Target: 100% compliance. 2013/14: not-compliant; 2012/13: 100%; 2011/12: 100%).4


This year we expect to receive a single non-compliant assessment of resource-consent conditions. Sampling of the Karori Stream downstream of the Western Wastewater Treatment Plant is required during high-rainfall events that raise plant inflows and discharges. However, heavy or sustained rainfall also makes collecting samples from this site a significant safety risk for personnel. Therefore, while this measure has not been achieved fully, this is due to overriding health and safety factors that are outside of our control. We are currently working with the consent manager, GWRC, to identify an appropriate solution.

Source: Wellington Water

What it cost

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.4.1 Sewage Collection and Disposal Network1
Expenditure 19,348 18,767 (581) 17,886
Revenue (986) (571) 415 (1,859)
Net Expenditure 18,362 18,196 (166) 16,027
2.4.2 Sewage Treatment
Expenditure 21,333 22,837 1,504 21,683
Revenue (1,833) (656) 1,177 (1,041)
Net Expenditure 19,500 22,181 2,681 20,642
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.4.1 Sewage Collection and Disposal Network2
Expenditure 7,959 7,745 (214) 7,924
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward n/a - - n/a
  1. Under budget due to savings wastewater treatment due to reduced flows through Moa Point and savings on electricity.
  2. Over budget due to a late urgent renewal of the sewer interceptor in Tully Street.

 

2.5
Stormwater
Wai-ua
Top

The stormwater network keeps people and property safe from flooding.

 

What we do

These services are delivered by Wellington Water and include:

  • maintain, renew and upgrade the stormwater network to protect flooding.

What we achieved

The development of Integrated Catchment Management Plans (ICMP) for the city is underway. We are currently in Stage 2 of this project, which aims to prepare detailed management plans to meet the levels of service required for the city’s stormwater activities, identify management options to minimise catchment issues and determine preferred remedial methods for issues identified. Five catchments have been identified for the development of the first set of ICMPs. These were selected on the basis of the effects of flooding and contamination of the coastal receiving environments. Among these five catchments, the first ICMP is being developed for the Lambton Harbour catchment. The ICMP developed will allow Regional Plans or other catchment management requirements to be added over time. These plans will be prepared as part of an on-going water management partnership between the Wellington City Council, Greater Wellington Regional Council and the community.

How we performed

Overall, performance is at a high level. Residents continue to be highly satisfied with the services we provide, we are responsive to customer requests and we have maintained resource consent compliance. While flooding incidents have been recorded, these often results from extreme weather events outside of our control.

We measure the standard of the stormwater service

Residents (%) who agree stormwater services provide good value for money 

Result: 71% (Target: 75%. 2013/14: 69%; 2012/13: 69%).

Source: WCC Residents Monitoring Survey 2015

Customer (%) satisfaction with stormwater network service

Response time to service requests (%) within one hour of notification

Result: 99% (Target: 95%. 2013/14: 98%; 2012/13: 77%). In 2014/15, 324 calls were received in this category, while in 2013/14, 253 calls were received.

Source: Wellington Water

Number of buildings reported to have been flooded as a result of a less than 1-in-50-year rain event

Result: 22 properties flooded (Target: 0. 2013/14: 5; 2012/13: 49).

This year Wellington experienced several extreme weather events, including three greater than 1-in-50-year rain events. The severity of these events means that our flood mitigation efforts are not always sufficient to prevent instances of flooding.

The affected properties were a mixture of residential and commercial properties in mainly Kilbirnie, Johnsonville, Basin Reserve/Lower Adelaide Road and Tawa. Funds have been allocated to alleviate flooding problems depending on the solution found and agreed with the property owner.

Source: Wellington Water

We understand the impact of stormwater on the environment

Bathing beaches (%) compliance with Ministry for the Environment guidelines (Green Status)

Stormwater resource consent compliance (includes the monitoring of overflows, stormwater outfall discharge and coastal water quality)

Stormwater resource consent compliance has been achieved. (Target: Achieve compliance. 2013/14: Achieved).

Source: Wellington Water

What it cost

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.5.1 Stormwater Management1
Expenditure 16,526 18,777 2,251 17,503
Revenue (922) (129) 793 (1,852)
Net Expenditure 15,604 18,648 3,044 15,651
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.5.1 Stormwater Management2
Expenditure 4,821 4,255 (566) 4,193
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward n/a - - n/a
  1. Under budget due to savings on insurance costs and depreciation, following the revaluation of infrastructure assets.
  2. Over budget due to completion of projects ahead of schedule, including the completion of Stage 3 of the Tasman Street stormwater renewal.

 

2.6
Conservation attractions
Ngā painga kukume Papa Atawha
Top

Nature is one of Wellington’s biggest attractions.

 

What we do

We support the Wellington Zoo and Zealandia with funding. We are also supporting the Zoo’s upgrade programme, including the ongoing expansion of the Meet the Locals Exhibition. These facilities play important conservation roles and protect native as well as exotic flora and fauna. They inform and educate, attract visitors and their existence creates economic incentives for the city’s environment to be protected and enhanced. We also play a monitoring role, by annually reporting on the performance of these organisations.

What we achieved

We supported the Wellington Zoo, which celebrated very good visitation numbers. The Zoo had 225,927 visitors during the last year. It also opened the Grassland Cats Habitat in September 2014, exceeded its target of volunteer hours by 140% and was a major contributor to the Sustainable Council Value Chain project.

Meet the Locals. We have completed stages 1 and 2 of this project and the opening is planned for October 2015.

Annual visitor numbers to Zealandia exceeded target by 6,143 visitors, totalling 97,543. These increased numbers are an indicator of how Zealandia is engaging with visitors, students, researchers and volunteers to grow conservation understanding and knowledge.

Zealandia successfully contributed to conservation efforts and we supported them. The first known successful Tieke (Saddleback) nest outside the sanctuary was discovered and chicks were banded before they fledged to enable later monitoring of survival and movements. Zealandia banded the 500th Kakariki in the Sanctuary during March and note that increasing sightings of Kakariki confirm this species is spreading throughout Wellington.

How we performed

Performance has been excellent this year with record visitor numbers at Zealandia and consistently high levels at the Wellington Zoo. This year we also exceeded our target for education programme attendees.

We measure the success of our investments in promoting the city

Zoo Visitors

Zealandia visitors

Zealandia – education programme attendees

Result: 6,768 (Target: 5,281. 2013/14: 8,048; 2012/13: 7,645; 2011/12: 6,556; 2010/11: 7,068).

Source: Zealandia

What it cost

Operating
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.6.1 Conservation Visitor Attractions
Expenditure 6,104 6,126 22 5,962
Revenue - - - -
Net Expenditure 6,104 6,126 22 5,962
Capital
Expenditure
($000)
Actual
2015
Budget
2015
Variance
2015
Actual
2014
2.6.1 Conservation Visitor Attractions1
Expenditure 2,677 1,177 (1,500) 1,203
Unspent portion of budget to be carried forward n/a 1,483 - n/a
  1. Budget includes $1.87m carried forward from the 2013/14 year for the construction and completion of the 'Meet the Locals' project at Wellington Zoo. The project is due for completion by the end of 2015.
3We include this measure here because street cleaning affects water quality in the harbour and city waterways.
4The same matter that caused a non-compliant result in 2014/15 also resulted in a non-compliant assessment for 2013/14. This was not reported in our 2013/14 Annual Report, as we were not aware of the breach of consent condition at the time of publication. This result has now been updated. ​